Dragon

Dragon

Ever since I can remember, a big pleasure in life is to look at clouds as they drift above.  Here, in California, where I live, clouds are rare, and thus to be savored even more.  They come with the rain – sometimes fluffy cumulus towering above the mountains – sometimes thin cirrus drifting at high altitudes.

Dragon ii

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A View of the Pacific

A View of the Pacific

Having grown up in a land-locked part of the country, the ocean always fascinates me.  I took this, sitting on a cliff overlooking the great, blue Pacific, on the edge of a continent, on the border of an ocean, thousands of miles east of another continent completely unknown to me.

For the Vernal Equinox

Sycamore-3

This has been a crazy several weeks . . . primarily, car problems leading to searching for a new one to replace the one which died, and finally taking the plunge.  I got what I wanted.

However, the fact is, life came to a halt.  No time for photography, only time to take a quick peek at what I have already done.  Today, I got out and about, but this is from a roll I did a couple of weeks ago.

A sycamore tree with new leaves!  How glorious is that?  Taken with Portra 400, Voigtlander RF, Heliar 105mm, 6×9 folder.

Goody Bag

Goody Bag

While out shooting with the Voigtlander, I was just trying to use film up – I needed to see if there were any light leaks in the bellows.  Light tight!  This was done with Portra 400, and converted to B&W in Nik.

Friend

Friend

I’ve a small collection of older cameras.  This is a portrait of one of my favorite people, taken with a Voigtlander RF, a folder from the 1930s.  It has a Heliar uncoated lens, 105mm, which is appropriate for the 6×9 camera size.  The film is Portra 400, 120.

I have done some post processing here, cleaning up a streak running through the film, as well as erasing bits and pieces of odd detritus.  I also pushed the color a bit, as the original image was rather pale – perhaps a bit overexposed.

Toward Dusk

Toward Dusk

Last month was hot, dry, and beautiful.  We have had rains, we have had heat, and so the usual beiges of winter have given way to soft yellows and greens.  At sunset, though, the geology of the landscape shows itself in the shadows.  There is very little vegetation to hide the rocks and inclines and erosion of time.